• Ever feel like you don’t deserve your good fortune?

    When you feel like you don't deserve your good fortune

    For all the work I’ve been doing on money and mindset recently, I still struggle sometimes with it all.

    The last few years have been awesome for my income growth  and financial security.

    And yet the thought keeps rearing its head: I don’t deserve this. How long can this last?

    What I’m doing to counter these doubts:

    Reminding myself there is room to grow

    I know it’s possible to do so. Salary surveys and job listings out there prove it. As do people I’ve worked with who earn more. (Of course, this leads to another dangerous path that lies in the complete opposite direction – why don’t I already make that much?)

    Remembering that me having less doesn’t make the world a better place somehow

    The starving artist, nobility is poverty mindset dies hard, I guess. And it’s ridiculous. Me struggling would do nobody any good. I try to remember to give back by donating every month, as well as trying to somewhat regularly give blood, meet up with my mentee, and I’ve also recently joined a local nonprofit board. (Another trigger for imposter syndrome right there!)

    Reviewing how far I’ve come

    I’m horrible at tracking my accomplishments. But I recently updated my CV and LinkedIn (you don’t even want to know how long that took me) and when I’m feeling down on myself professionally, I look back at some of the stuff I’ve done for reassurance.

    How do you cope when you feel like you don’t deserve what you’ve got?

  • The dumbest excuses I used to …. not ask for more money

    3 reasons to negotiate your pay

    3 reasons to ask for a raise

    3 reasons to negotiate your salary

    I didn’t negotiate salary until age 26.

    And the first time I asked for a raise was at age 28.

    Don’t do that, guys.

    I actually don’t really regret not negotiating my first couple of job offers. Why? Well, they fell into the categories described here on Ask A Manager.

    But I do regret not asking for a raise earlier. The job that I held the longest? Prime opportunity! And sadly, a missed one.

    3 (bad) reasons I didn’t push for more

    I justified not asking for a raise or higher salary to myself for years. But you don’t get what you don’t ask for, and who doesn’t want more money?

    I didn’t feel underpaid

    I feel fortunate to have earned market rates. I never felt lowballed. I’ve never been through the wringer of learning that a co-worker made tons more money than me for doing the same job. And so I’ve never felt that particular burning motivation.

    Sure, I felt I was getting fairly paid … but would more money have hurt? Definitely not.

    And I think, in hindsight, there’s a fair chance I could’ve gotten more if I’d only asked.

    Not having HR, not having reviews or any sort of structure around performance  … none of that is a good excuse. But also…

    I was scared to ask

    Asserting myself doesn’t come naturally, and unlike my parents who have no shame in bargaining for a deal, I can’t even bring myself to haggle at markets where it’s expected.

    And my anchor points, deep down, I think skew low (baselining off things like the hourly rates at my first part-time jobs, the low-paying field I then went into, what my parents earned when I was growing up etc).

    I just wanted to fly under the radar and do a good job, in a dying industry. I didn’t want to draw attention to myself. Ugh.

    I thought it just seemed like a bad idea

    Being employed in a industry struggling to make a profit, I felt lucky to have a job at all. I felt competent, but not outstanding.

    I didn’t think that I had any concrete reasons to point to that proved why I deserved more; no ammo with which to back up a request for a raise.

    The former may have been true, but what’s the worst that could have happened?

    As for the latter, I’m pretty sure that was just imposter syndrome talking.



    I can’t even tell you how searingly awkward it was to negotiate that first salary offer (err, and the next one…) and ask for that first raise. I wince when I recall them! But I was crazy proud of myself afterwards, not to mention a little bit richer.

    And if you’re stuck in the cycle of underearning, breaking out will mean getting comfortable with asking for more.

    Not that you need them, but just quickly…

    3 good reasons to ask for more

    Literally a couple of (painful, awkward) minutes could net you thousands more a year, and that compounds over time.

    Their budgets are bigger than yours

    A few grand might make a big difference in your life, but probably won’t affect their bottom line to the same degree. There’s usually some wiggle room, and you know what? Employers won’t be surprised if you negotiate – they expect you to advocate for yourself.

    It sets a precedent for the future

    Raises build on what’s come before. The more you earn now, the bigger those 2%, 3%, 5%, 10% bumps will be later on.

    Raises aren’t a sure thing

    You can’t count 100% on regular raises once you’re in. You’ve got the most leverage at the offer stage, so that’s the time to make the most of it.

    Need more help on this front? Head over to The Luxe Strategist’s epic post on negotiating for yourself.

    *Part of Financially Savvy Saturdays on brokeGIRLrich.*

  • RaboDirect managed funds are no longer. What now?

    Change is tough, right?

    Particularly when it requires a decision from you.

    I first started investing on my own through RaboDirect’s managed funds, because I already had online savings and term deposits there. It was pretty easy to buy online, aside from the security layers required each time you log in that is! And after, I don’t know, 10 years or whatever, I guess there’s a bit of sentiment there.

    Now that RaboDirect is pulling out of the managed funds business, I’ve got to decide what to do with the few thousand I have in funds over there. (It’s also apparently winding up the Cash Advantage Fund and Term Advantage Fund 🙁 )

    Obviously nowadays we have a lot more choice as small-time retail investors, and more passive investing options. Case in point: I started investing through Smartshares last year. Granted, there are hardly any online capabilities there (quite frankly, I would have no idea at this stage how to go about selling my holdings) but that money’s for the long term so I’m okay with that.

    Options for existing RaboDirect investors are to hang in there until March, when all our units would be sold and cashed out; or to transition over to InvestNow. That would mean giving consent for RaboDirect to facilitate the opening of an InvestNow account (as I don’t currently use InvestNow) and the eventual transfer of my investments over to that platform.

    Pros of InvestNow seem to be low fees, access to Vanguard funds and a modern digital platform. That said, I might also need to investigate Superlife more closely (blogger The Smart and Lazy has done a quick comparison of some of Smartshares/Superlife/Simplicity/InvestNow here).

    I suspect I’ll wind up doing that – path of least resistance, as well! –  but if you’re in the same boat, I’d be curious as to what you’re thinking!

  • Class, relationships and money: What happens when opposites attract?

    hands

     

    What happens when Hillbilly Elegy meets Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother?

    (Oddly enough, JD Vance, author of the former, credits Amy Chua, author of the latter, as a key influence in his life and success – she was one of his professors at Yale).

    There’s lots of talk about interracial relationships, but I’m just as interested – scratch that, I’m WAY more interested – in cross-class relationships. Ones in which partners hail from very different upbringings and class backgrounds. Class barriers are not as immediately visible as racial differences, but that doesn’t mean we should gloss over their power. We just have to work harder to identify and address them.

    We’ve always had contrasting views on and approaches to money and career stuff. I’d always thought these stemmed from our wildly different personality types – and that is an important factor for sure – but I’ve come to believe that the biggest influence that shapes our approaches is our polar opposite upbringings.

    While Jessi Streib’s book The Power of the Past: Understanding Cross-Class Marriages is hardly a definitive work on this topic (it’s based on interviews with a small group of white middle-class American couples, where one partner grew up blue-collar and the other white-collar), I personally found it hugely validating of my own experiences, and it even shed some light on things I hadn’t previously considered.

    The main gist is that white-collar upbringings are associated with a more structured, managerial, proactive approach to not just money, but life in general. These partners tended to spend only after research and budgeting; save for the future; actively manage their careers; and plan and organise their time. Their blue-collar partners generally spent for today; bought without thinking; let weekends unfold at home and went with the flow.

    In short, white-collar = planner, blue-collar = laissez faire. This was true of most, though not all cases in the book.

    She makes the case that the class we’re born into leaves an imprint. Yet even after years together, the couples overlooked the ways class shaped their ideas and choices (rather perceiving these as stemming only from personality differences). Almost every couple interviewed were drawn to each other because of those differences, however many later felt that these became things they lived with but did not love. “The things that you’re drawn to sometimes become the things that drive you crazy,” one observed.

    Money, unsurprisingly, was a key battleground. People like Aaron, who spent their childhoods imagining what they would spend once they had money. bought everything he wanted once he started earning. No longer bound by constraints, he used money to distance himself from his past. Despite leaving their original class behind, they retained the strategies they learned at home.

    The strategies that worked for their parents, who typically had limited means, were spending when money was available and having faith it would work out. Worrying was pointless, since they would always have financial difficulties and no amount of planning or fretting would change that. Low savings weren’t a cause for concern, as they had always gotten by on a shoestring. And that was at complete odds with the views of their white-collar partners.

    Of course, that’s not to say that this is a blanket, universal rule. Obviously, there are blue-collar families that are financially comfortable, and white-collar families that aren’t. And for some people, growing up without much can be a great incentive to build their own security.

    I put a call out for thoughts from people in similar boats – cross-class partnerships – and was pleasantly surprised by how willing you guys were to engage on this subject. One thing is clear to me:  the PF blogging world is its own microcosm – who have mostly experienced quite the opposite of the dynamic Streib writes about!

    Because he grew up with nothing, he’s arguably got more hustle than better-off peers.

    If I dated a fellow silver spooner, I may not see as much drive and ambition in him and instead just complacency and entitlement.

    We’ve also got quite a few hustlers who grew up with not much and paired off with more laissez faire, well-off partners.

     

     

    (That said, there may well be a lot of overlap with typical immigrant values/mentality – because that’s another common thread among many of the people who replied.)

    Savvy Financial Latina and her husband grew up at different ends of the socioeconomic spectrum. Her family immigrated to the USA when she was 7 years old.

    “On top of all the cultural differences (completely different discussion), my parents had money problems. They never spent more money than they ever had. Actually, they were always the ones with savings despite their low income. Family members and friends knew they could reach out to my parents for money. I learned quickly my parents were too nice and they have been burned (again another note). I would love to say even though my parents were poor, life was happy at home. In general, the lack of money combined with other life events, always, always caused a lot of stress in my family.

    “I grew up knowing I didn’t want to be poor because when you are poor you have no options. I wished many times Superman would come rescue me and suddenly transport me to a new life. I had to work really hard to get to where I am today.

    “On the other hand, my husband grew up in a fairly middle income class family. I say they were upper middle income class, but his family assures us they were lower middle income class. To this day, they don’t realize how blessed they are. As part of a “Jones” family, he always got what he wanted in life. Enough toys, vacations, etc.”

    While coming from different backgrounds has definitely influenced their individual perceptions of money, she says they’ve slowly moved towards more of a happy medium after many years together.

    “I’m definitely the more frugal person, always saving for tomorrow. I watch every penny, and although have loosened up to some extent, I still keep up with every penny. My main fear is not having enough money.

    “I earn more money. I view work as a means to an end, but work hard to get the most out of it! My husband views life in a more relaxed way and thinks there should be more leisure. He doesn’t see the need to climb the ladder. I view more work, ultimately, as a blessing. He views more work hours as bad. I’m always thinking 5, 10, 15, 20 years ahead. My husband doesn’t think he’ll live past 45 LOL.

    “I’m starting to loosen up a lot more. Especially when you compare me to 5-6 years ago. Now, I think the next couple of years will be finding a middle ground where we are saving enough for FI and enjoying life.”




    Here’s another story shared anonymously with me, where she and her husband are both savers and both make good incomes but essentially hail from different rungs of the ladder. While both of their families have always had blue collar jobs, her parents own a blue collar business that has enabled them to build wealth and given them many more glimpses of white collar life. His parents don’t talk about money period while hers do – all the time.

    “My mom never grew out of her poverty mindset despite the wealth mine have built, which in turn left me with some poverty mindset for a while. It’s really bizarre to my husband to listen to my mom talk about how broke my parents are all the time when they aren’t really.

    “My husband is only now starting to believe me that financial independence is a real thing…basically as we hit its early milestones. No one in his family has really ever retired, so it seems crazy to him as a possibility. If we wanted to spend MMM levels of money, we could quit working right now, both of us. But we don’t want to spend that little and my husband doesn’t want to retire before his parents. They already think it’s bizarre enough that just his income can support us – they have no concept of our household income and we mostly just avoid talking about money with them.”

    His parents have no retirement savings – something she says she spends a lot of time worrying about, while her husband tries to avoid thinking about it.

    Wedding planning has also highlighted the differences between their families.

    “My husband’s extended family mostly don’t have passports so they likely won’t come, with that additional cost on top of flights. His parents and siblings are coming but they’ve definitely been telling us how expensive it is, while my parents are trying to save the $20/night hotel parking cost by parking at our place (that’s a firm no, parents!) during the event. My parents think we don’t have enough things on the registry, his parents should be paying for more things, etc. Weddings bring out so many class differences. My parents think we picked too expensive of a venue while his think the food sounds delicious. Honestly I have much less patience now for my parents trying to say they’re broke with his parents actually being broke.

    “Vacation and travel planning is another difference. His parents and siblings all work blue collar jobs where they don’t know very far in advance if they can get the time off. So they pick dates before they book flights! This confuses the heck out of me because my parents would always adjust the dates to more reasonable prices so the dates were never final until they booked flights! My parents wanted to buy us a two week Christmas trip to somewhere warm this past year and it freaked the hell out of my husband. Their wedding gift being 10x his parents’ didn’t weird him out since that was a one off thing but he did not understand parents buying a trip for their grown children.

    “I could probably go on about this stuff forever. I didn’t think our class differences were that severe but it turns out they’re more subtle than I realized.”

    One thing is clear: it’s a journey but it does get easier – the beginning is the hardest. 

    As one blogger put it:

    Lots of trying to teach him long-term vision with money.

    Progress is slow, but it’s getting better.

     

  • The 3 paralysing emotions that will hold you back financially

    3 EMOTIONS THAT HOLD US BACK WITH MONEY

    When it comes to money, there are a few intense emotions most of us experience at some point that paralyse us financially.

    I’ve struggled with every single one of these, and if there’s one thing those battles have taught me, it’s this: we are our own worst enemies.

    The mind is a powerful, powerful thing and that cuts both ways. It’s up to us to harness that power and use it to our advantage.

    Regret

    Regret that you didn’t negotiate that salary. Regret for all the money you spent on things you didn’t care about. Regret for the money you wasted on deadbeat exes.

    As hard as these regrets are to stomach, there’s only one way forward: Accepting the past, learning from those mistakes, and moving on. We all move through this process at our pace, but sooner is better, and healthier.

    Fear

    Fear of losing an income source, of some financial disaster striking, of the unknown in general.

    Living in a state of constant tension and low-level panic SUCKS and it takes its toll.

    That’s where a solid savings buffer and good insurance cover come in – knowing you’ve got those safety nets to fall back on. And so too does making contingency plans.

    Some people don’t like to imagine the worst-case scenario, but I’m the kind who needs to confront my worst fears rather than hide from them – to ask myself questions like “Has it happened before? What are the odds of it happening? What would I do then?”

    In lots of cases, the catastrophes we’ve conjured up in our lizard brains are over-exaggerated. They have never happened and are not likely to.

    Guilt

    Guilt for all that you have now, all the privileges you’ve been blessed with … and the fact that yet you want more.

    But you know what I’ve realised? It does nobody else any good for me to struggle, to not have what I want, to play the martyr.

    By taking care of myself first and flourishing, I can then turn around and help others. Giving back is fantastic, once you can comfortably and safely do so from a solid position.

    Each of these are ultimately useless emotions, and I’m personally done with wasting my time and headspace on them! We’ll be covering all of them – and much more – in my new course, Money Groove. Sign up below to get the lowdown.

    *Part of Financially Savvy Saturdays on brokeGIRLrich.*

  • The accidental breadwinner

    HOW I BECAME AN ACCIDENTAL BREADWINNER

    I never envisioned myself as a high earner. And I’m still not. But somehow, I’ve found myself in the position of accidental breadwinner.

    I had no interest in the typical commercial career paths (I was one of like three Asians in the journalism track of my degree). Zero interest in climbing the corporate ladder. Money was not a consideration for me when I was thinking about careers. I didn’t set out to earn heaps and I didn’t aspire to it. I embarked on a creative path and didn’t imagine veering from it.

    And then, like so many other journalists, I left – for a new challenge, yes, but also for more financial security. I make decent though not crazy money, I enjoy my work and my life, and I can’t imagine any other way now.

    It wasn’t all smooth sailing. As it turned out, T happened to be unemployed at the point of each of my significant income increases. I suspect unconsciously this led to problems.  We could survive (although not thrive) on my earnings alone. The more I made, the less urgency there was for him to contribute … until it all boiled over.

    For a long time I kind of hoped he’d somehow land an epic job that would set us up for the future, take the pressure off me, let me sit back and relax for while (payback, if you like, for all I’d done for so long).

    I’ve come to terms with the fact that this is unlikely, and that odds are I’ll continue to be the breadwinner. It’s a strange concept to accept, a new way to see myself, even though it’s been definitively true for many years now. But it is definitely no longer a temporary thing. It’s just how it’s going to be.

    He landed a new job this year. I’m so proud of him. Stepped up of his own accord. He knew he needed to bring in more and set about changing that. #makingshithappen

    The extra money certainly makes a difference. Here’s to thriving, not just surviving.

    Our income differential is still massive though, and we’re not anticipating huge pay jumps that would change that equation. That’s fine.

    Ultimately, we’re both people who never expected to make much money. People who never ever imagined earning, say, $60k. While I’ve broken through that barrier and more – I can’t and don’t necessarily expect the same for both of us. What I can count on is myself, and continuing on the quest to get paid well for doing work I love, or as close to it as possible.

  • Online grocery shopping has seriously changed my life

    Groceries

    By: Tasha

    Life has never been busier, and while I’m hanging out for Pak n Save to join the online supermarket shopping revolution (come on Foodstuffs!) I’ve cobbled together a routine in the meantime with a couple of other online retailers.

    For meat: The Meat Box

    Finding quality, affordable meat has long been an issue for us. Supermarkets have been grim and uninspiring in this department, and even the butcher lately has been disappointing. Cue The Meat Box!

    The Meat Box is a local operation (we still get handwritten thank you cards with every delivery) and we’ve found it offers really good value for us. The prices are reasonable and the quality is great. We usually order one of the Couples Boxes and occasionally make up a custom box of individual packed meat items. The downside is they only deliver Tuesday-Friday and the cutoff time is 7am the day prior to delivery – so basically, 2 nights before in reality (unless you enjoy ordering groceries immediately upon getting out of bed?)

    North Island deliveries are $8, but there are special discounts from time to time sent out via email and Facebook. And you can get $10 off your first order by signing up for the newsletter!

    For other stuff: Greenkart

    Greenkart is another local operation that sells everything from meat and produce to dairy, packaged goods and personal care items. Not as extensive in range of products or brands offered as a supermarket, but possibly more so than your local dairy or corner shop. The weekly specials can be quite good too. Delivery charges range from $6 to free depending on how much you spend.

    The best part is the flexibility. You can literally order on the same day at a pinch! They deliver every day, and offer delivery options in 3-hour slots (eg you can request delivery between 9am-12pm). I usually just place my order the day before.

    Most relevant Facebook ad ever – so glad I saw it …I actually clicked and wound up eventually downloading the app! Yep, there is an app! Seriously. However, the interface for adding your credit card details is horrendous. I’m fairly tech savvy but it took me way too long to figure it out, and I nearly gave up. There’s a visual of a credit card and you have to tap the relevant parts on the fake card to enter your real digits, if that makes sense – complete with ‘flipping’ it over to enter your CVV number on the back.

    Now they just need to keep building out their product range further (new stuff is frequently added, so they’re on to it).

     

    (I also returned to Foodbox for a few weeks – lured in by their new Careful Couple offering.

    However, I’m not in love with the interface (there’s no itemised pricing; to work out what something costs I had to add or remove it from the cart and see how the total cost changed) and they charge $6 for the chiller box, which they’re supposed to pick up the next time, and refund you … except the driver never did collect ours.)




    Typically we still do a small supermarket run for things like milk, pet food, toiletries, cereal, pantry staples etc, but this lets us get in and out SO much quicker and reduces the mental load by a huge factor.

    This is obviously not the route to go if you’re trying to shop for food as cheaply as possible – you’d need to be driving around to small fruit and veg/meat/ethnic/bulk buy shops – but at this stage in life it’s saving a ton of time and hassle.

    What’s your grocery shopping routine?

  • The one expense that seems like a waste of money … until you need it

     

    THE ONE BUDGET CATEGORY YOU CAN'T AFFORD TO GO WITHOUT

    ONE EXPENSE YOU MUST BUDGET FOR

    INSURANCE MIGHT SEEM LIKE A WASTE OF MONEY ... UNTIL YOU NEED IT

    Insurance might feel like money down the drain, but having been caught out without it in the past, let me tell ya: I learned my lesson early on. It’s one thing my family wasn’t really big on, and so it’s been a case of self-education in my 20s.

    Contents insurance (for your crap)

    So important IMO, and increasingly cheap. I’m seeing affordable renters’ policies advertised in mainstream media now, which is a new trend, and a good one.

    Our flat was burgled while I was at uni and I lost a few things, most devastatingly, my laptop. Annoyingly, I had been pondering taking out contents insurance but decided we couldn’t really afford it at that point while scraping by on a student income.

    I took out a contents insurance policy after that incident and it’s served me well since, through multiple break-ins and claims over the years. The cost dropped to just a few hundred dollars once I bought my house, which was a nice surprise.

    Plus, if you’re still flatting, contents insurance can cover you in the event that you cause damage to the property you’re renting (just in case you inadvertently cause a fire, flood, that kind of thing).

    Car insurance (for your wheels)

    Even the shittiest scrap heap needs to be insured. If you own a vehicle, this is a must!

    At the very least, third-party insurance covers you if you cause an accident. Even the tiniest ding to someone else’s car – the kind you think can’t possibly cost more than a couple of hundred dollars to fix out of pocket – almost certainly costs way, way more. Trust me on that one.

    And of course, comprehensive insurance gives you peace of mind if you know you couldn’t afford to replace your car in a pinch.

    House insurance (for the most expensive thing you’ll probably ever own)

    After working my ass off to be able to have a place to call home, you can bet I want to protect it in case of fire, flood, earthquake or whatever else might jeopardise the roof over my head. (Also, the bank doesn’t give me a choice :P)

    Life insurance (for what you leave behind)

    To cover my mortgage in case I cark it. I don’t have dependents but this obviously becomes infinitely more important if there are kids in the picture.

    Trauma/disability/income insurance (for your moneyyyyy)

    More expensive than life insurance, but arguably more important. Financially speaking, your ability to earn is probably your biggest asset … and yet we often don’t take the appropriate steps to protect this.

    ACC is meant to cover you if you have an accident but I can’t say I have a lot of faith in them. As we learned, it needs to have a defined cause – we lost out on a full month of income a few years ago when ACC refused to stump up a few years back. And it doesn’t cover illness, which is obviously another huge threat to your income – they say that illness stops far more people from working than accidents do. Plus, if you’re made redundant, you may not be able to get unemployment benefits (if you have a working partner, as again, we know all too well, and there are probably other exclusions too).

    Insurance can help replace your income in the event of temporary or permanent disability, or illness. It’s not something we generally talk about, but I bet you more people than you think around you have income protection insurance (and a lot of those who don’t, quite possibly should). Redundancy cover, from what I’ve seen, is less common and quite pricey, but there are also rent/mortgage protection policies that can help cover your biggest cost, at least.




    I prefer to pay my insurance premiums annually, and they almost all fall sometime in the first quarter of the year.

    It’s a painful hit to absorb, but when I ask myself how I would feel if I wasn’t covered for at least the very basics, my gut instantly reminds me that I’m doing the right thing for peace of mind.

    *Part of Financially Savvy Saturdays on brokeGIRLrich.*

  • There’s nothing like being able to throw money at a problem

    SOMETIMES YOU JUST NEED TO THROW MONEY AT A PROBLEM

    Some things are much better solved with money than time.

    Some things can ONLY be solved with money.

    Most of the issues I’ve had have fallen into one of the above categories.




    When the dogs broke a window

    When we had to replace tyre after tyre after tyre due to pesky nails turning up in the treads

    When our pets required unexpected veterinary care

    When our vacuum died

    When I suddenly needed to get my wisdom teeth out

    When our reactive dog really needed expert help

    When we needed X rays done

    When we simply needed help with keeping the house clean

    When only prescription meds could help with skin issues

    When we suddenly had to move house

    When my glasses broke accidentally

    It’s interesting to me to look at this list and see how many are health/medical related. (Also, dog related. Sigh.)

    T has been seeing a chiro regularly and that’s a chunk of money for appointments that only last a few minutes at a time… but is well worth it.

    Lately it’s also become clear to me just how much some of my coworkers must spend on healthcare. For health insurance. For specialist visits. For private surgeries.

    As someone who never even goes to the doctor except in dire circumstances, it’s all so strange and foreign to me.

    Melanie recently asked what the best thing is that money has afforded us.

    Aside from the ability to sleep at night, like I told her, I would also add the ability to not worry about health costs. When you’re talking about your health, financial stress/constraints are the last thing you want to deal with on top of all that.

  • How often do you think about money?

    how often do you think about money?

    No, seriously.

    Constantly? Throughout the day? Daily? Every few days? Once a week? As little as possible?

    I’d have to say, more often than I can consciously count. Some aren’t really active thoughts as such, but general emotions related to finances, if that makes sense – feelings tied to broader money issues that are never far from my mind.

    Lately, of course, they’ve often revolved around the financials of having kids. Patently ridiculous given actual timelines, but the nervous nelly/overplanner in me keeps rearing her head.

    Here’s another thought…

    How often would you LIKE to think about money?

    For me, it doesn’t really matter, I don’t think. As long as the thoughts and feelings are positive.

    Therein lies the trap, of course. More often than not, those money thoughts come with stress and worry.

    How frequently do you really think about money? What specifically are those thoughts about?