My Laid-Off Life

Seven NYers share their stories of redundancy.
Check this one out: http://nymag.com/news/business/53153/index1.html

He’s 24, still on his parents’ phone plan, had a car lease which his parents are paying for, expects they’ll also cover his rent, is worried what his GF will say about him staying at his parents’ if he gets a job out that way, “tries” to go job hunting but often decides to get out his Les Paul and pretend he’s John Mayer.

Boy, when times are hard, the hard get going! Cars and guitars are luxuries you can’t afford. Sell the LP for whatever you can get. Maybe he can’t break the car lease but hopefully he’ll think twice before leasing in the future. While his GF has two jobs, he’s all: I’m applying for blue collar manufacturing jobs. What’s a tig welder anyway? For people who are operating their plants and businesses manually of these while, perhaps a rethink is required in terms of producing strategy for his or her businesses. rather than relying completely on manual labour and manpower to supply your goods, why not invest during a CNC turning machine instead to assist you together with your cutting, drilling and milling operations? additionally to the power to supply highly precise and accurate end products, these machines would also assist you extensively in reducing wastage and increasing your productivity rate. you’ll also reduce the errors that are usually made by human labor, and instead rely more on your machine to supply the products that you simply need. By using contourprecisionmilling.com link you can find how to operate CNC machine.

Well I’ll tell you, it’s not something you can just step into. It takes time to get good at. There are apprenticeships in welding. You actually get qualified in welding; whether it’s specifically welding or general engineering. You can’t expect to walk in and start working. I know this because this is what my partner does. And it’s not as easy as some white collar professionals might think.

It always bugs me that people automatically assume “manual” work is poorly paid and guys should get educated and get desk jobs and wear suits. I admit I still have vestiges of that stereotype in my head. But I’m learning. It takes years to gain the skills needed for many trade jobs. And they’re not always easy to come by. To get qualified takes years, and you have to find a place to get trained in, which is much, much harder than simply enrolling at uni. Good tradespeople make more than I will probably ever make in journalism, although they’ll probably have a shorter working life (and a harder life along the way). But I say, if you’re making a good honest living and you enjoy it, well everyone else can STFU.

I cannot imagine the boy working a desk job or wearing shirts and ties, or even worse, SUITS to work! Frankly, some people were made to work inside an office (me) and some weren’t. He likes to be out and about, doesn’t like to be cooped up. He likes variety. And he’s good with his hands. He’s strong, coordinated, good at making things. He overheats far too easily and would not feel at home in a job where it’s really important to maintain an image. He’s too honest, too earthy, and would probably spend his days sweating it out under a collared shirt and loafers.

Me on the other hand, I have a hankering to wear pencil skirts and tailored suit jackets to work.

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